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Watch the Makers!

Bio.
Reverend and the Makers

Great pop music can be many things, it can be escapist, euphoric, it can be about love and loss. It can also be about the everyday, the magic in the mundane, the soundtrack to real life – a modern urban folk music.

It takes a special talent to make magic out of the kitchen sink, to tell the story of the real world with an intimate touch that doesn’t sound patronising. John McLure of Reverend and the Makers made his name with this kind of writing and the new album sees the band return with their most concise and perfect work yet. If Shane Meadows could made great contemporary pop records mashing the rush of indie with the hedonistic pulse of electronics and dance then this what they would sound like.

The album title is ‘@reverend_makers’ because, as McLure explains, ‘the songs the little situations I see living in Sheffield in 2012.  Nothing seems to sum up the present and the times we live in more than the @ symbol.’

After a three year hiatus, ‘@reverend_makers’ takes this a stage further with every song sounding like a 21st century pop classic, marrying indie melodies with the sparse electronics that dominate his home city – it’s the sound of bedsits cranking their music, soundclashing across the city night.

The album also sees a return to the hook strewn guitar flavoured electro indie pop of his initial musical forays with great choruses and melancholic rain swept tunes. Classic northern pop.

Reverend And The Makers are back to reclaim their crown. Never has real life sounded so good. The tumbledown of cheap drugs, gritty realism, thrilling escapism, sex, and fish and chip suppers, hedonistic living, all night dance music in dank semi legal cellars, and the comedown – all soundtracked by great guitar music.

‘There has to be a band writing songs about real life again, there’s loads of songs about nowt. I’m writing songs about what people can relate to.’ explains McLure, a man who has found himself and doesn’t need to escape any more.